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Machine Work in Gold! Guest Blogger Christina Fairley Erickson

November 24, 2017
Layered fabrics, handmade cords, applied burnt-out pieces with metallic thread stitching by Laura Elmore

Layered fabrics, handmade cords, applied burnt-out pieces with metallic thread stitching by Laura Elmore

As we are entering the holiday season with the glisten of icicles and sparkling of lights, our group of students met to learn goldwork techniques on the sewing machine, to add that extra pizzazz to our stitch!  Each student learned how to adjust their machine to use many different kinds metallic threads, which can be challenging.

Layering hand painted and dyed fabrics with gold and metallic trims, adding extra 3D elements like handmade cords and metal thread burnout elements, and trying new techniques like gold-leaf foiling, couching, whip stitch and cable stitch with metal threads gave us plenty to play with!

Take a look, get inspired, and add some glitz to your stitch!

Gloria Shelton stitching metal threads on a sheer that can be burnt away.

Gloria Shelton stitching metal threads on a sheer that can be burnt away.

Layered fabrics and stitched metal threads by Steffany Neuschaefer

Layered fabrics and stitched metal threads by Steffany Neuschaefer

Satin Stitch, zigzag, and couched cord in metal threads by Karen Nelson

Satin Stitch, zigzag, and couched cord in metal threads by Karen Nelson

Layered fabrics, cable stitch with thick metallic threads, and applied 3D metallic burn out by Christina Fairley Erickson

Layered fabrics, cable stitch with thick metallic threads, and applied 3D metallic burn out by Christina Fairley Erickson

Gail Harker consulting with Karen Nelson about goldwork by machine.

Gail Harker consulting with Karen Nelson about goldwork by machine.

Layered fabrics, handmade cords, cable stitch, and machine goldwork circle by Pat Christensen

Layered fabrics, handmade cords, cable stitch, and machine goldwork circle by Pat Christensen

Couched gold trims by Gloria Shelton

Satin stitches and couched handmade cords by Christina Fairley Erickson

Satin stitch and couched handmade cords by Christina Fairley Erickson

Applied metallic thread burnout with layered fabrics, metallic scraps, and metal thread stitching by Karen Nelson

Applied metallic thread burnout with layered fabrics, metallic scraps, and metal thread stitching by Karen Nelson

Gold leaf on hand-dyed fabric by Christina Fairley Erickson

Gold leaf on hand-dyed fabric by Christina Fairley Erickson

Machine Gold Work class (l to r): Christina Fairley Erickson, Gail Harker (tutor), Laura Elmore , Karen Nelson, Pat Christensen, Gloria Shelton and Steffany Neuschaefer

Machine Gold Work class (l to r): Christina Fairley Erickson, Gail Harker (tutor), Laura Elmore , Karen Nelson, Pat Christensen, Gloria Shelton and Steffany Neuschaefer

Looking More Closely at Textiles: Terri Shinn and Dianne Corso

October 23, 2017

Yesterday I posted a blog about the exhibition Creative Passion and Stitch at La Conner Quilt and Fiber Arts Museum where 5 of our level 4 Diploma students are exhibiting their work from programs at the Gail Harker Center for Creative Arts. Textiles are dimensional, textural and so enticing when you actually see them in reality. They appeal to all of our senses.  I can only try to give you a glimpse into some of the many qualities that aren’t always appreciated in one photo. It takes detailed work to understand and learn to work with the mediums that students are using.  At this level, each student pursues her own study with coaching at our center.  I only wish you could see the mountain of designs, samples and prototypes that students create to support one finished item. Today I’m showing images from Terri Shinn and Dianne Corso of one of their completed artworks.  If you can,  come to the exhibit, on til Dec. 30th..   Gail Harker

 

Gail Harker’s Level 4 Diploma Group Exhibit at Quilt and Fiber Art Museum

October 23, 2017
19_Branches_of_Gold_13x15_TerriShinn

Branches of Gold – Painted fabric, Goldwork and hand stitch © Terri Shinn

The exhibition Creative Passion and Stitch gives a fascinating glimpse into an imaginative world of  five graduates from the Gail Harker Center for Creative Arts. They are exhibiting their original design work and experimental stitch techniques in an old world Victorian atmosphere at the Pacific Northwest Quilt and Fiber Arts Museum in La Conner, Washington.  Penny Peters, the 5 graduates and I had a great time hanging the artwork for 2 days before the opening. The five graduates include Dianne Corso of Anacortes, WA, Isabel Parker of Port Alberni, BC, Canada, Marie Plakos of Langley, WA, Susan Sasnett of Seattle, WA and Terri Shinn of Snohomish, WA. The exhibition at the Museum is on now until Dec. 30, 2017. Check out the Museum’s website for opening hours and other exhibits on at the same time.  Allow yourself a leisurely day as there is so much to look at. Here are a few photos below of the Exhibit opening and artwork from the students.  Click on the red links above to see even more of their artwork.  Gail Harker

 

Imagine, I Have the Ability to Create Art… Guest Blogger: Rhonda Papiernik

October 9, 2017

Studies in Art and Design 301 – Exhibition – Class name: Gladiola –  Blog 7 and last in the series.

When I first met Gail, I was a confirmed crafter.  I had done crochet, knitting, hand and machine embroidery, crewel work, cross stitch, rug hooking, sewing, quilting, hundreds of different craft projects, stained glass work, flower arranging, bits and pieces of so many different things. I prided myself on being able to do almost any ‘craft’ that someone else created and perhaps explore the boundaries a bit and create something that was the same idea but somewhat my own.  I enrolled in my first one week class with Gail because a friend was doing it and I thought it might be fun.  Well, almost immediately, Gail began to tell me that I had the ability to create art. Imagine!! Almost 4 years later, I have produced a few hundred samples, experimented with mediums that I had never heard of previously and created some pieces that I, humbly, would call original art. The idea that I actually have the ability to take a thought or concept from the beginning stage of just having a spark of an idea through the process of refining it, stretching it, playing with it and ending up with a final piece has been a revelation. The support of Gail and my fellow Gladiola’s has been a consistent joy as we encouraged and gently pushed each other along our different pathways.  I’m looking forward to using the concepts that I’ve learned in this course in exploring some fabric art and perhaps making a few art quilts in the near future until I have enough vacation time for another class.

Art has Lifted Me Up and Made Me Whole….Guest Blogger: Marilyn Pitman Waite

October 1, 2017

Studies in Art and Design 301 exhibition (Gladiola) Blog #6 in a series

Learning Never Stops – Art has been my lifeline for the last 25 years.  It has lifted me up and has made me whole.  My main medium was sculpting, primarily marble and clay of the earth. In acclimating to the Pacific NW, I serendipitously found new art mediums. One of them was a return to stitch in a new way. And then I found Gail Harker’s Creative Art Center where my development of my art has continued! I’ve been able to converse with and interact with art elements with time and space to learn new techniques and explore them in an in-depth way.

Line has taken me on a journey to stripes.  I’ve revisited the pre-historic lines in the caves in France, Persia and Africa to the present day of a “stripe war” between Gucci vs. Forever 21!

Stripes have opened my eyes to its use of “stripe only” by a number of 20th century artists and a more thorough study of Matisse, looking at his patterns and stripes as background.  Years ago I took a trip to France; the focus of my trip was to see The Chapelle du Rosaire, in Vence.  I experience his whole creativity then and this year immersed myself using my catalogue and other sources to “see” this work in a new way.

Studying techniques led me to uncover and experiment on small samples and this I have incorporated into my art practice. With these samples as a guide I will begin to explore stitch in the same way.

To paraphrase Paul Klee, my striped lines took me on a journey that will last me forever.

 

 

Exploring New Ideas and Techniques Guest Blogger: Iris Bell

September 22, 2017

Studies in Art and Design 301 Exhibition (Gladiola) Blog #5 in a series

Art is a form of relaxation for me.  I enjoy the way colors and textures work together and the way that they make people feel.  Over the past two years I have learnt to explore many different techniques while using the theories of Art and Design.  I have worked with color studies and developing sketchbooks of inspiration that will provide many years of design sources.

During this journey I have discovered that I enjoy pulling abstract images from close up photos.  I am amazed with the number of different designs that can be extracted from one image.  For a large part of my work these past few sessions I have used a portion of the centre of clematis.  From this one component I have developed a number different explorations with a number still not explored.  I am enjoying the way that there is a continual exploration of new ideas and techniques.

I’ve Learnt a Lot about Color and Detail: Guest Blogger: Alana Koehler

September 12, 2017

Studies in Art and Design 301 Exhibition (Gladiolas) Blog #4 in a series.

Without much background in art before coming to study with Gail, I’ve learned a lot about color and detail.  I’ve started to notice shape, color, and design, from the plums I picked this morning to just being out in nature. I’ve broadened my use of color from my usual favorites to colors I hadn’t used much before.  I explored two main themes—a slice of Chalcedony agate that I saw at the DeYoung Museum, and a bunya bunya tree, and studied them in many different ways, especially the shapes and lines.  I’m looking forward to continuing to play with these themes and others.

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