Skip to content

For the Love of Pattern and Design

May 24, 2014

 

King St. Station

King St. Station looks very different and not that attractive  on the exterior but there are surprises within.

King St. Station

King St. Station

I am in love with pattern and design.  This love affair started while living in Britain when studying the unlikely subject of historical embroidery. I soon realized that the historic embroidery patterns were reflected from an art style of their time.  Pattern from past centuries and other cultures all make their way into my life, one way or the other. Who knows when an element of historic design may be included in a contemporary design that I am working on.

King St. Station

King St. Station

As soon as we got off the train and walked through the entrance to the King Street Station, built in 1906, we were surrounded by a sparkling white interior laden with decoration on the vastly high ceilings and walls.

King St. Station

King St. Station

It seems that the train station was purchased for $10.00 in 2008 by the City of Seattle and they have just done a complete renovation on the building, uncovering a multitude of beautiful decorative elements.

King St. Station

King St. Station

This station is described as Italianate in style.  There was a strong wave of  architectural Italian influences in the States and other countries in this time period.

 The Exchange Building

The Exchange Building  – Walking from King’s St. Station Seattle along 2nd Ave. is a rich experience full of turn of the century visual surprises. Usually we are dashing from one place to the next. This time because we went by train, we could slow down to look. Art Deco reigned supreme on The Exchange Building, built in 1930. 22 floors high, it was at its time the 2nd tallest building in the U.S.A.

The Exchange Building

The Exchange Building

It was no surprise to me that the architect – John Graham was born in Britain.

The Exchange Building

The Exchange Building

 There are a series of ogees filled with either floral or squid like patterns on the building front.

The Exchange Building

The Exchange Building

P1120550crp1

 Even the man hole covers have distinguishing designs on them.

P1120566crp1

  A brass design with ferns along the way.

P1120569crp1

P1120572

 There are many such plaques on buildings here.

Broderick Bldg.

Broderick Bldg.

Broderick Bldg.

Broderick Bldg. Symmetrical designs were a sign of the times.

P1120575crp1

 Cheery smiles and directions

3 Comments leave one →
  1. Ann Darling permalink
    May 24, 2014 8:35 pm

    Art and design is all around us, if we just take time to stop and look! Inspiring for sure. Thanks for sharing Gail.

  2. pennypeters permalink
    May 24, 2014 10:51 pm

    Lovely graceful patterns, even in Seattle. During my recent trip to Spain I focused some of my photographic efforts on patterns too. Soon I’ll send a blog with patterns from Spain! Thanks for sharing. Penny

  3. Maren Richter permalink
    May 25, 2014 4:23 pm

    Thanks, Gail, for the reminder to slow down and take some time to observe. There will always be rich visual surprises, even in your own hometown. Great photos!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: